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The Minor

ISCOR is an incredibly diverse and interdisciplinary field of study that combines elements from a multitude of majors and minors across campus. A minor in ISCOR allows students to get a broad understanding of the state of security in our world and the nature of conflict negotiation while diving into related courses from a wide spectrum of options. Having a minor in ISCOR allows students to explore a unique perspective on our world and gain a greater global view. ISCOR can be a great compliment to any major and has many professional uses for all sorts of careers.

The minor in international security and conflict resolution consists of a minimum of 18 units to include:

ISCOR 300: Global Systems
Prerequisite: Nine units of General Education requirements in Foundations of Learning, to include three units each in Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, in Social and Behavioral Sciences, and in Humanities.
Evolution and development of global systems, characteristics of contemporary and global systems and formulation of criteria for projecting the future of the systems.

ISCOR 301: Conflict and Conflict Resolution
Prerequisite: Nine units of General Education requirements in Foundations of Learning, to include three units each in Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, in Social and Behavioral Sciences, and in Humanities.
Conflict resolution as an emerging field; theories of conflict; methods and implications of conflict management including group, institutional, and international level analysis.

ISCOR 310: Our Global Future
Identifies resource and social crises toward which contemporary American values are leading, examines the nature of human action; contrasts other value systems with ours; considers origins of our values and the individual’s potential for changing them.

ISCOR 320: International Security in the Nuclear Age
Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Nine units of General Education requirements in Foundations of Learning, to include three units each in Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, in Social and Behavioral Sciences, and in Humanities.
International security issues from historical, ethical, economic and sociopsychological perspectives, including the security environment after the Cold War and current sources of conflict. The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons is discussed.

Political Science 375: International Relations: Theory and Practice
Prevailing and critical theories of international relations and application to historical developments and contemporary issues in global affairs.

Three units selected from:

Anthropology 102: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Studies the relationship to the environment, preliterate society, systems of social organization, politics, economics, religion, and language.

Economics 101: Principles of Economics
Principles of economic analysis in the areas of national income analysis, money and banking, business cycles, and economic stabilization.

Geography 102: Principles of Cultural Geography
Studies elements of culture such as language, political organization, settlement patterns and population, and more.

History 101: World History
Modern history from a global perspective, 1500 to present.  

Political Science 103: Introduction to Comparative Politics
Examination of problems of decision-making and control in various political systems, emphasizing political action in cultural contexts.

Religious Studies 101: World Religions
Broad historical development and philosophical overview of major world and selected tribal traditions from primal times to present.

Courses in the minor may not be counted toward the major, but may be used to satisfy preparation for the major and general education requirements, if applicable. A minimum of six upper division units must be completed in residence at San Diego State University.

All international security and conflict resolution minors are required to complete a study abroad experience. To meet this requirement, minors must complete one of the following with the preapproved and written consent of the undergraduate Advisor:

  1. A CSU Study Abroad Program;
  2. An SDSU Exchange Program;
  3. An SDSU Study Abroad Program;
  4. An SDSU Study Travel Program;
  5. International Security and Conflict Resolution 450.

See our Study Abroad page for more information.

For more information, please see the General Catalog and SDSU Class Schedule.

 

Advising

Dr. Allen Greb
Office: SH-223B
Phone: (619) 594-3768
Email: [email protected]

Director

Dr. Latha Varadajaran
Office: NH 124
Phone: (619) 594-3255
Email:[email protected]